Women & Wealth

A Sure-Fire Way to Increase Your Self Worth

I always asked High Earners: “Are you doing what you’re doing for the money?” No, they insisted, quite vehemently. They were driven by the  passion, by the challenge, by the recognition. But not money.

Yet, in the next breath, they all said the same thing. “But I damn well want to be well compensated…because I know I’m worth it!”

Where did their strong sense of self-worth come from, I initially wondered? As a chronic underearner, I wanted what they had. The answer soon became stunningly clear.

They had a simple strategy. Whenever they were asked to do something, whenever an opportunity arose, if their reaction wasn’t a strong ‘Hell Yes!’ it was clearly a “Hell No!”

These women each told me that, initially, they were afraid to speak up and tell the truth. But they forced themselves to ask for what they wanted, just as they said ‘no’ to what they didn’t want.

This simple (but scary) act was the secret to their financial success. Here’s why:

  • Asking for more is an act of self-love.
  • Saying no is a statement of self-respect.
  • Refusing to settle is a show of self-esteem.
  • And walking away is a sign of self-trust.

Whenever you stand up for what you want, whenever you refuse to take less than you deserve, your life will begin to change, sometimes dramatically.

You’ll also notice a shift in how you feel about yourself. Speaking up becomes not something you should do, but something you have to do – because you know in your heart you’re worth it.

Where do you need to start speaking up? Tell me about it in the comments below.

How much Risk Can You Handle?

With soaring inflation soaring and turbulent markets, it’s a good time to discuss an important conceptRisk tolerance.

You’ve probably heard those words bandied about when talk turns to investing. But do you know what they mean?

Risk tolerance is generally defined as the ability to stomach large swings in the value of your investment portfolio.  The market, by nature, is very volatile. It’s vital to understand your level of tolerance for risk in order to make prudent decisions.

Here are 3 factors to help you figure out how much risk you can tolerate:

The first factor is time. When will you need the money? Generally, you can take a lot more risk if you’ve got 10-years or more. Money you need in the next 3-5 years should be in cash. You don’t want to be forced to sell if the market is down.

The second factor is cash reservesHow much cash do you have on hand? If all your money is fully invested, with no extra cash to cover unexpected expenses, that would be a problem. Either you must sell at a loss or go into debt.

The third factor is sleep. How much volatility can you stand before you start stressing out, unable to sleep at night? We all know what happens if we don’t get enough shut-eye. Everything suffers!

Those factors are crucial considerations. But keep in mind. Your biggest risk is not protecting yourself against inflation.

Stuffing your entire savings under the mattress is like living in a house full of termites. Even if nothing seems awry, you’ll doubtlessly be dealing with costly damages down the line.

What do you feel your risk tolerance is? Has it changed in the current market situation? Tell me what you think below.

The Poem That Forever Changed My Financial Life

I was leafing through some old files when I found a poem from a lifetime ago. Instantly, a rush of painful memories flooded my brain.

My life was in shambles. My husband’s gambling was out of control. The ATM kept insisting we had no money. I hated myself for being so helpless.

I prayed constantly, begging God to do something—just as I begged my husband to stop gambling. Both ignored me.

Until the day an envelope came in the mail, with no return address. Inside was a poem—no title, neatly typed, all caps, on crisp white paper. I read it and gasped.

The message was obvious. And terrifying. Spirit was telling me what I had to do—face my fear head on.

$uccess As a Spiritual Practice

Deepak Chopra once said, “We need a more spiritual approach to success and to affluence.”

I couldn’t agree more.

I even coined a word to describe this approach: Metafiscal–that which blends financial know-how with metaphysical principles; a melding of the sacred and the mundane in regards to money.

You don’t have to be religious to be Metafiscal. I’m certainly not. But something happens when you develop a deep sense of trust in the inexplicable forces of the Universe.

Having a Hard Time Saving and Investing? Let Me Make It Super Easy!!!

After my divorce from the gambling husband and after I paid the outrageous tax bills, my nest egg was almost depleted. But I had a few properties that paid rent every month.

One of the first things I did, when that rent came in, before I spent a cent, I immediately put a portion of it into savings. Otherwise, I knew I’d spend it all.

And I did it automatically. It was so simple. I filled out a form and the bank automatically transferred money from my checking account to savings. The amount was small at first, but it added up quickly. I didn’t even have to think about it.

Automating gave me discipline without having to work at it. It’s easy to say that you’ll move money monthly into savings. In practice, however, it just doesn’t happen. You forget. You overspend, You have a hundred excuses.

But by automating, you don’t miss what you don’t see. This was the beginning of my creating really good financial habits—habits I still practice today.

Looking for Yaysayers? Here’s How You Find Them.

Are you having a hard time achieving the level of success you desire and deserve?  Here’s some sage advice:  No one will do it for you, but you don’t have to do it alone!

I learned this from the savvy women I interviewed for my book. Prince Charming Isn’t Coming. Not one of those women succeeded in isolation. I realized I couldn’t either.

Listening to their stories inspired me to take action, despite my crippling fear, and showed me what to do to get smart.

Support is particularly critical for us women. We are relationship oriented. Connection is extremely important to us.

We thrive on the synergy of mutual support and collaboration. We love to share our experience with another. We do our best when others are cheering us on and holding us accountable.

But a word of warning is in order.  Be selective when seeking support. There are basically two kinds of people: the Naysayers and the Yaysayers.

The Real Reward for Taking Control of Money: A True Story

It was a lunch I’ll never forget. Just after I sold my first book to the publisher, I flew to NY and met my editor at a restaurant.

As we got acquainted, I asked if she invested. She got really embarrassed. I felt horrible.

”Oh no!” she stammered. “I have no money.”

I felt terrible and dropped the subject never to address it again. Two years later, after my book hit the shelves, she called me out of the blue.

“Remember that lunch when I told you I had no money. Well, I did, but it was sitting in cash in my retirement account,” she told me. “But after working with you, I realized how foolish that was.”

So she started educating herself, found an advisor and her 401 (k) was now fully invested. She even emptied her spare change into a jar every night and had invested that too.

Another (Better) Way to View Market Volatility

The market’s looking pretty scary these days, right? But honestly, it’s not the turbulence that will get you in trouble. It’s your emotional reaction to it.

Studies show that most investors, regardless of gender, tend to act on emotion, instead of rational thinking, when making financial decisions.

When markets take a tumble, our emotions, especially fear, take over, and we abandon ship, suffering losses.

The emotional reaction also happens in reverse. When the market is on a big run, there’s a tendency to take on too much risk and follow the herd, like so many did during the dot com and real estate booms.

May I suggest another way to view this volatility? Heed the advice of my favorite Wall Street Journal columnist, Jason Zweig: Be thankful that stocks are going down.

A Pep Talk For a Plunging Market

What do you do when the market has more stomach-churning dips than a roller coaster?  Like now!

Obey the rule of the roller coaster: You only get hurt when you jump off Same with the market. You only lose money when you sell.

So what do you do when the market plunges? Follow the sage advice from investment firm, Ellevest, in their newsletter What the Elle.

Do Nothing.

As Sylvia Kwan, Ellevest’s Chief Investment Officer, explains: “Over the past 93 years, the stock market has gone up by an average of nearly 10 percent a year. But it didn’t go straight up!”

Indeed, markets always do what markets do: bounce around wildly. Like now.

Fear of Success? Or Fear of Power?

She sat across the table, looking like the savvy businesswoman she was.

As we chatted over kale salads, she told me how her company, not yet two years old, was growing exponentially.

Then she lowered her voice and leaned in close. “There’s something I need to talk about. I’ve never shared this with anyone.”

“What is it?” I asked, also leaning forward. I could tell this was difficult for her.

“I’m afraid of success. I can already see little ways I’m holding myself back.”

When I asked what scared her, she replied, “I’m afraid people won’t like me. I’m afraid people will want more of me than I can give them. I’m scared it will all be too much.”

Meet Barbara Huson

When a devastating financial crisis rocked her world, Barbara Huson knew she had to get smart about money… and she did. Now, she wants to empower every women to take charge of their money and take charge of their lives! She’s doing just that with her best-selling books, life changing retreats and private financial coaching.

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